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Friday, 14 July 2017

HOW TO WRITE AN EUPHUISTICALLY INCOMPREHENSIBLE ESSAY

Postcapitalist constructivist theory, libertarianism and cultural narrative

Henry Hubbard
Department of Politics, Miskatonic University, Arkham, USA
C. Thomas d’Erlette
Department of English, Harvard University

1. Smith and cultural narrative

The characteristic theme of Dietrich’s[1] critique of precultural theory is a mythopoetical totality. Tilton[2] implies that we have to choose between constructive predeconstructivist theory and dialectic postcapitalist theory. In a sense, in Mallrats, Smith analyses precultural theory; in Dogma he examines dialectic theory.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the concept of neocultural language. Marx promotes the use of precultural theory to modify society. But if the textual paradigm of narrative holds, the works of Smith are modernistic.

The primary theme of the works of Smith is the bridge between sexual identity and class. The subject is contextualised into a cultural narrative that includes reality as a paradox. In a sense, a number of desituationisms concerning precultural theory may be found.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. Buxton[3] holds that we have to choose between the capitalist paradigm of discourse and postmodernist theory. But in Clerks, Smith reiterates constructive predeconstructivist theory; in Mallrats, although, he examines Lacanist obscurity.

The characteristic theme of Brophy’s[4] model of precultural theory is a self-supporting whole. Lyotard suggests the use of subdialectic textual theory to attack sexism. It could be said that if precultural theory holds, the works of Smith are an example of mythopoetical libertarianism.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the concept of predialectic narrativity. Werther[5] suggests that we have to choose between constructive predeconstructivist theory and cultural nihilism. Therefore, the primary theme of the works of Smith is the difference between class and society.

“Sexuality is impossible,” says Sontag. The subject is interpolated into a postdialectic paradigm of reality that includes culture as a totality. But the premise of cultural narrative holds that the purpose of the artist is significant form.

If one examines cultural narrative, one is faced with a choice: either accept precultural theory or conclude that consciousness is capable of truth, given that truth is distinct from language. The example of the predeconstructivist paradigm of consensus depicted in Smith’s Chasing Amy is also evident in Dogma. However, many desublimations concerning not, in fact, materialism, but submaterialism exist.

The characteristic theme of von Ludwig’s[6] critique of cultural narrative is the role of the poet as writer. Therefore, in JFK, Stone affirms precultural theory; in Heaven and Earth, however, he
reiterates constructive predeconstructivist theory.

Marx’s model of precultural theory implies that the significance of the poet is deconstruction. However, a number of destructuralisms concerning cultural narrative may be discovered.

Debord promotes the use of constructive predeconstructivist theory to read and deconstruct society. In a sense, capitalist pretextual theory holds that academe is intrinsically meaningless, but only if the premise of precultural theory is valid; if that is not the case, sexual identity has objective value.

If capitalist narrative holds, we have to choose between constructive predeconstructivist theory and Marxist class. However, la Tournier[7] states that the works of Stone are modernistic.

If precultural theory holds, we have to choose between constructive predeconstructivist theory and dialectic precultural theory. Therefore, Foucault uses the term ‘precultural theory’ to denote the common ground between society and culture.

The subject is contextualised into a Lacanist obscurity that includes narrativity as a whole. But Marx uses the term ‘precultural theory’ to denote a self-sufficient totality.

Bataille suggests the use of cultural narrative to attack hierarchy. Therefore, the primary theme of the works of Stone is not narrative, but neonarrative.

Lyotard uses the term ‘conceptual theory’ to denote the role of the writer as reader. Thus, the opening/closing distinction prevalent in Stone’s JFK emerges again in Heaven and Earth, although in a more subdialectic sense.

Many discourses concerning a mythopoetical reality exist. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a cultural narrative that includes language as a paradox.

The main theme of Prinn’s[8] essay on Derridaist reading is the role of the observer as poet. Thus, Lyotard’s critique of cultural narrative suggests that the raison d’etre of the writer is social comment,
given that narrativity is equal to truth.
2. Expressions of defining characteristic
“Class is part of the meaninglessness of consciousness,” says Baudrillard; however, according to Long[9] , it is not so much class that is part of the meaninglessness of consciousness, but rather the absurdity, and some would say the defining characteristic, of class. The subject is contextualised into a precultural theory that includes language as a totality. However, Sontag uses the term ‘cultural narrative’ to denote a cultural reality.

In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. The subject is interpolated into a predialectic desublimation that includes sexuality as a whole. But Lacan promotes the use of precultural theory to analyse society.

The primary theme of the works of Gibson is the fatal flaw, and eventually the dialectic, of semantic sexual identity. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of posttextual rationalism to challenge outdated perceptions of society.

Hanfkopf[10] states that the works of Gibson are postmodern. Thus, a number of theories concerning constructive predeconstructivist theory may be found.

If precultural theory holds, we have to choose between cultural narrative and the conceptual paradigm of discourse. But the example of subtextual capitalist theory depicted in Spelling’s Charmed is also evident in Models, Inc.

Precultural theory suggests that culture is impossible. However, Lacan uses the term ‘the predialectic paradigm of reality’ to denote not deconstruction, but subdeconstruction.
3. Spelling and constructive predeconstructivist theory

“Class is fundamentally elitist,” says Marx; however, according to Dietrich[11] , it is not so much class that is fundamentally elitist, but rather the rubicon, and some would say the failure, of class. Foucault promotes the use of precultural theory to modify and attack society. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘constructive predeconstructivist theory’ to denote a mythopoetical reality.

The characteristic theme of von Ludwig’s[12] model of precultural theory is the bridge between class and sexual identity. La Tournier[13] implies that we have to choose between cultural narrative and the modern paradigm of reality. But the premise of constructive predeconstructivist theory holds that class, perhaps paradoxically, has significance.

If precultural theory holds, the works of Gaiman are empowering. However, cultural narrative implies that the establishment is capable of significant form.

Any number of discourses concerning not theory, as subtextual depatriarchialism suggests, but pretheory exist. Therefore, the main theme of the works of Gaiman is the difference between sexual identity and consciousness.

Drucker[14] states that we have to choose between cultural narrative and submodernist narrative. But Lacan uses the term ‘capitalist postconstructive theory’ to denote a self-fulfilling whole.

The subject is contextualised into a constructive predeconstructivist theory that includes sexuality as a paradox. Thus, if the textual paradigm of expression holds, we have to choose between cultural narrative and precapitalist dematerialism.
_______________________
NOTES (nonexistent)
  1. Dietrich, R. ed. (1984) Reading Sartre: Cultural narrative in the works of Cage. O’Reilly & Associates
  2. Tilton, D. U. S. (1973) Cultural narrative and constructive predeconstructivist theory. University of Michigan Press
  3. Buxton, L. Q. ed. (1992) The Defining characteristic of Society: Libertarianism, cultural narrative and subdialectic construction. Cambridge University Press
  4. Brophy, A. N. P. (1989) Constructive predeconstructivist theory and cultural narrative. Loompanics
  5. Werther, R. T. ed. (1995) The Dialectic of Consensus: Cultural narrative in the works of Stone. And/Or Press
  6. von Ludwig, L. T. F. (1971) Cultural narrative in the works of Stone. Schlangekraft
  7. la Tournier, I. Z. ed. (1986) Deconstructing Derrida: Cultural narrative, neocultural deconstruction and libertarianism. O’Reilly & Associates
  8. Prinn, L. U. S. (1974) Cultural narrative in the works of Koons. Schlangekraft
  9. Long, D. ed. (1999) The Economy of Context: Constructive predeconstructivist theory in the works of Gibson. Loompanics
  10. Hanfkopf, Q. G. (1974) Cultural narrative in the works of Spelling. University of Oregon Press
  11. Dietrich, U. E. O. ed. (1993) Forgetting Baudrillard: Cultural narrative and constructive predeconstructivist theory. O’Reilly & Associates
  12. Von Ludwig, E. O. (1972) Cultural narrative in the works of Gaiman. Schlangekraft
  13. La Tournier, Z. P. B. ed. (1980) The Consensus of Rubicon: Constructive predeconstructivist theory and cultural narrative. Loompanics
  14. Drucker, H. E. (1996) Deconstructive libertarianism, libertarianism and cultural narrative. Schlangekraft
The essay you have just seen is completely meaningless and was randomly generated by the Postmodernism Generator. To generate another essay, follow this link.

The Postmodernism Generator was written by Andrew C. Bulhak using the Dada Engine, a system for generating random text from recursive grammars, and modified very slightly by Josh Larios (this version, anyway. There are others out there). 

The Generator was recommended by Richard Dawkins to show how useless certain complicated philosophers are, with their silly theories and babelic language.

On a similar vein, see my 100 PROOFS OF GOD'S EXISTENCE!